Here is the Scoop

I have a calendar and I have a plan. And I am 3 weeks behind my plan already. My goal is to post something every other week, at least, sometimes more in a week, sometimes less. So you may see this post today, and then see another later this week. This is my way to get my voice heard.

So what you will see here is a conglomeration of things:

  • Nature Study Updates
  • Nature Study Book Project Updates
  • Writings, musing, and photos about my garden, the farm, the challenges, and the successes
  • Writings about life in general and thoughts that run through my head
  • Writings about my personal businesses: Lucky 7 Studios and Adams Consulting
  • Comments, thoughts, etc… about other peoples writings/posts
  • Writings about my research and being published — which by the way I just submitted an article for a magazine right before I wrote this — will keep you updated!
  • Other things I am involved in — for example: Salem Second Saturday — Come pARTy! in Downtown Salem as we celebrate the ARTS! (August 10, 2019) and other things
  • My art, quilting, sketching, and miscellaneous musings.

Nature Book Project for 2019

As promised in the Post Nature Study Goals 2019, here is my list of books for 2019. In trying to keep my, sometimes lofty, goals more manageable, I have only chosen 5 for this year. Each title will take you to a link where you can purchase the book or find more information. I do not receive any compensation if you choose to follow the link. 

“For many of us, thinking about the future conjures up images of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road: a post-apocalyptic dystopia stripped of nature. Richard Louv, author of the landmark bestseller Last Child in the Woods, urges us to change our vision of the future, suggesting that if we reconceive environmentalism and sustainability, they will evolve into a larger movement that will touch every part of society. This New Nature Movement taps into the restorative powers of the natural world to boost mental acuity and creativity; promote health and wellness; build smarter and more sustainable businesses, communities, and economies; and ultimately strengthen human bonds. Supported by groundbreaking research, anecdotal evidence, and compelling personal stories, Louv offers renewed optimism while challenging us to rethink the way we live.”

  • The Laws Guide to Nature Drawing and Journaling– John Muir Laws. This book is one I already own and was looking at it here and there over the last few years. It has been on my list of books for many a year. So this year, I will read it through. You can find out more about John Muir Law on his website. https://johnmuirlaws.comThere is so much inspiration.

“The ultimate guide to nature drawing and journaling! A potent combination of art, science, and boundless enthusiasm, the latest art instruction book from John Muir Laws (The Laws Guide to Drawing Birds) is a how-to guide for becoming a better artist and a more attentive naturalist. In straightforward text complemented by step-by-step illustrations, dozens of exercises lead the hand and mind through creating accurate reproductions of plants and animals as well as landscapes, skies, and more. Laws provides clear, practical advice for every step of the process for artists at every level, from the basics of choosing supplies to advanced techniques. While the book’s advice will improve the skills of already accomplished artists, the emphasis on seeing, learning, and feeling will make this book valuable—even revelatory—to anyone interested in the natural world, no matter how rudimentary their artistic abilities.”

“Experience the splendor of nature with fresh eyes! Featuring an inspiring portfolio from Clare Walker Leslie’s nature journals, this guide offers easy-to-learn techniques for capturing the world around you in pictures and words. Encouraging you to make journaling a part of your daily routine, Keeping a Nature Journal is full of engaging exercises and stimulating prompts that will help you hone your powers of observation and appreciate new aspects of nature’s endlessly varied beauty.”

“Looking for a faster, easier, and engaging way to identify plants? Related plants have similar characteristics, and they often have similar uses. Rather than learning new plants one-at-a-time, it is possible to learn them by the hundreds, based on plant family patterns.

Each family of related plants has unique patterns for identification. Learn to recognize these patterns, and discover them again and again in the plants you encounter. It is possible to instantly recognize a plant never before seen, and in many cases, to know its edible or medicinal properties on the spot-even before you have identified it down to the species!

Botany in a Day is changing the way people learn about plants. A one-day tutorial introduces eight of the world’s most common plant families, applicable to more than 45,000 species of plants. Master these eight patterns and have the skills to recognize an astonishing number of plants on any continent. Add to your repertoire by keying out entirely unknown plants and learning additional family patterns.
Botany in a Day is principally written for North America, but used and adored by readers all over the world. It is used as a textbook in numerous universities, high schools, and herbal schools. This book is widely used in nature programs and promoted in national parks. Botany in a Day is your passport connection to nature and discovering the amazing world of plants!”

  • Walden– Henry David Thoreau. This is a book I had been reading and set aside. There is so much to learn about so many topics, not just nature, but also minimalism and the cost of living. The link is to the book I own and where I purchased. 

Henry David Thoreau was a sturdy individualist and a lover of nature. In March, 1845, he built himself a wooden hut on the edge of Walden Pond, near Concord, Massachusetts, where he lived until September 1847. Walden is Thoreau’s autobiographical account of his Robinson Crusoe existence, bare of creature comforts but rich in contemplation of the wonders of nature and the ways of man. 

You do not want to miss the book reviews as I read through these in 2019, so be sure to follow along by subscribing to the blog. I promise I will NEVER rent, sell, lease, or give your contact information away. 

What books are in Your Nature Book Project for 2019? Leave me a comment and a link. 

Nature Study Goals for 2019

I received an email from Barbara McCoy of the Outdoor Hour Challenge titled Nature Book Project 2019. This sent me down an Internet Rabbit Hole, not only on her website, but into many a place.

It appears as if the end of 2018 is around the corner and it is time to begin thinking of goals for 2019. I usually set a list of goals that covers front and back of a page (I still need to see what goals I may not have completed from this year). This year I feel I need to break it down into more manageable pieces. Nature Study is something I have enjoyed most of my life even though most of the “study” part has been hit or miss. During a rough patch last year, my mother suggested instead of just photographing nature, I ought to draw it. It needn’t to be perfect, you never have to show anyone. So, below I am listing my Nature Study Goals for 2019. Make sure to subscribe so you do not miss an update. You never know what will happen.

  1. Choose 5 – 10 Nature Study books: I have only chosen 5, so as not to become overly ambitious. I will post these in a separate post with a little more detail.
  2. Begin work on a long-term photo project –> I am choosing Farming through the Seasons in NE and East Central Ohio. This will be a multi-year project.
  3. Begin work on a long-term sketch project –>  My goal is to sketch my property corner to corner (3 acres). This is a multi-year project also. I think for 2019 I will work on the overall layout of the property. The final goal is to write a field guide to my property.
  4. Visit 1 new Ohio State Park that I have not visited. Reference: Ohio State Department of Natural Resources.
  5. Visit 1 new National Park. Reference: Passport To Your National Parks® program
  6.  Choose one or two hikes from the following guides and hike: Follow the Blue Blazes: A Guide to Hiking Ohio’s Buckeye Trail, Trail Guide to Cuyahoga Valley National Park, or Hiking Ohio, A Guide to the State’s Greatest Hikes.
  7. Complete a total of 52 Nature Journal Entries for the year.
  8. Choose 1 plant in my garden and sketch it from seed to plate (so to speak).
  9. Visit 2 places of Ohio History (there is nature everywhere and many to be found in historic locations) that are found in Ohio History Connection using the Passport to Ohio History.

Leave me a comment with your 2019 Nature Study Goals for 2019. I am looking forward to reaching our goals together.

Be sure to subscribe to my blog to keep up on all the great happenings and to follow along with my Nature Journal Goals for 2019. I promise your email address will be safe with me. I will not rent, sell, lease, or give it away.

I am not compensated for any link you may click from this article. Every one has been checked as the date of publishing this entry. 28Dec2018_JAA.